Thursday, April 19, 2018

Summer Acting Program Interview – Amilia Shaw

The Summer Acting Program at the Maggie Flanigan Studio in New York includes the six-week Meisner Summer Intensive. Amilia Shaw discusses the acting program and what it was like studying the Meisner technique at the studio. [caption id="attachment_9818" align="aligncenter" width="800"]Amilia Shaw discusses the acting program and what it was like studying the Meisner technique at the studio. Summer Acting Programs Interview - Amilia Shaw - Maggie Flanigan Studio[/caption]

Summer Acting Program: Amilia Shaw Interview

Q: Why did you decide to study at Maggie Flanigan Studio, starting with our six-week summer intensive?

I had an acting coach, and he told me, he was like, "I really want you to go to the Maggie Flanigan Studio and do their six-week intensive over this summer." I had just finished my freshman year of college. I was like, "Yes, of course. Oh, my gosh, Meisner. Yes." There's so many well-trained Meisner actors out there that I respect. So I was like, "Of course, yes." I did the six weeks. [post_author]

Q: Had you studied Meisner previously? Did you have a little bit of an insight to what it was going to be like?

My first year at my previous university, I read Stanislavski's book. Stanislavski was one of Meisner's teachers, so I had that perspective. Growing up in middle school and high-school, I did this program on Monday nights, that we explored a bunch of different acting forefathers like Suzuki and Meisner.

Q: What did you think it meant to train as an actor before you started the six-week summer intensive?

I thought, being an actor, it was all about practice making perfect. It was about going into class, doing scenes over and over again to the point where it becomes like second-nature, but it's not.

Q: What happened during the six weeks that changed your perspective on training?

I came in, and I was just stunned at how repetitive everything was. For the six-weeks, it was all the same structure. It was the same exercise with different elements, of course, added and subtracted. I started getting more frustrated than I'd ever been in my entire life. It made me question for the first time, and I was like, "This is what I've wanted all along." I feel myself starting to become what I've always wanted to be. It's through this frustration, it's through this being put outside of my comfort zone that I didn't know I desperately wanted until I had been offered that.

Q: What happened during the summer intensive that was a surprise or that changed you?

I got really angry, and I-- I felt obligated or entitled to my emotions for the first time, and I started breaking out of a shell. It was like I was disenchanted.

Q: Did you take any other classes during the summer intensive like movement or voice?

Yes, I took Movement 1, and Voice 1, and On-Camera Auditioning. [caption id="attachment_9831" align="aligncenter" width="800"]Summer Acting Programs Interview with Amilia Shaw at the Maggie Flanigan Studio Summer Acting Program Interview with Amilia Shaw at Maggie Flanigan Studio[/caption]

Q: How was that for you working during the movement and voice work simultaneously with the acting work?

It shouldn't be done any other way. They're so intertwined and interconnected. I'm over halfway through my first year here at Maggie Flanigan, and I've been taking-- well, I took the first semester off of movement and voice because I did it over the summer, but now I'm back in Movement 2 and Voice 2. It's such a relief to have that training on top of what we're doing in the room because it's everything that Charlie talks about in the room, it can be applied to what we do in movement and voice. Movement and voice are almost the same class in some regards because they're also interconnected.

Q: Why did you decide to leave your college program and join the two-year program?

It was very much an in retrospect decision because while I was at the university I was at, I was absolutely in love with it, and I had the best year of my life, one of the best years in my life. And it wasn't until I had been offered something I'd never been offered before when I came here that I needed to stay.

Q: How has it been working with Charlie? How do you describe him as a teacher?

Lots of people would say, "Charlie is so intimidating. He's so scary." I understand the perspective. I'm not scared of him. He repeatedly emphasizes that he only has our best interests in mind, and he has such a-- what am I trying to say, a sense of right and wrong that it's an inspiration to be in class with him, and you never feel like he is being belligerent for no reason. It's really touching actually how much individualized attention he gives us. It's nice because we're becoming more tight-knit because we're getting to know each other really well. I noticed that even with Charlie, we're building more of a relationship. He is getting to know me even better and I'm getting to know him even better. That just makes the work even better because it becomes more of a team effort. [caption id="attachment_9721" align="aligncenter" width="800"]Meisner Summer Acting Program - Maggie Flanigan Studio 01 Meisner Summer Acting Programs - Meisner Summer Intensive - Call 917-789-1599[/caption]

The Summer Acting Programs and the Meisner Intensive

To learn more about the summer acting program, the Meisner Intensive and the other acting programs at Maggie Flanigan Studio, visit the studio website online http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/ or call the front desk at 917-789-1599.  

The above blog post Summer Acting Program Interview – Amilia Shaw was first published to Acting Classes NYC

Summer Acting Program Interview – Amilia Shaw

Amilia Shaw discusses the acting program and what it was like studying the Meisner technique at the studio.

The Summer Acting Program at the Maggie Flanigan Studio in New York includes the six-week Meisner Summer Intensive. Amilia Shaw discusses the acting program and what it was like studying the Meisner technique at the studio.

Amilia Shaw discusses the acting program and what it was like studying the Meisner technique at the studio.

Summer Acting Programs Interview – Amilia Shaw – Maggie Flanigan Studio

Summer Acting Program: Amilia Shaw Interview

Q: Why did you decide to study at Maggie Flanigan Studio, starting with our six-week summer intensive?

I had an acting coach, and he told me, he was like, “I really want you to go to the Maggie Flanigan Studio and do their six-week intensive over this summer.” I had just finished my freshman year of college. I was like, “Yes, of course. Oh, my gosh, Meisner. Yes.” There’s so many well-trained Meisner actors out there that I respect. So I was like, “Of course, yes.” I did the six weeks.

author-pic

"I thought that being an actor was all about practice making perfect. It was about going into class, doing scenes over and over again to the point where it becomes like second-nature, but it's not."

Amilia ShawStudent, Two Year Acting Program

Q: Had you studied Meisner previously? Did you have a little bit of an insight to what it was going to be like?

My first year at my previous university, I read Stanislavski’s book. Stanislavski was one of Meisner’s teachers, so I had that perspective. Growing up in middle school and high-school, I did this program on Monday nights, that we explored a bunch of different acting forefathers like Suzuki and Meisner.

Q: What did you think it meant to train as an actor before you started the six-week summer intensive?

I thought, being an actor, it was all about practice making perfect. It was about going into class, doing scenes over and over again to the point where it becomes like second-nature, but it’s not.

Q: What happened during the six weeks that changed your perspective on training?

I came in, and I was just stunned at how repetitive everything was. For the six-weeks, it was all the same structure. It was the same exercise with different elements, of course, added and subtracted. I started getting more frustrated than I’d ever been in my entire life. It made me question for the first time, and I was like, “This is what I’ve wanted all along.” I feel myself starting to become what I’ve always wanted to be. It’s through this frustration, it’s through this being put outside of my comfort zone that I didn’t know I desperately wanted until I had been offered that.

Q: What happened during the summer intensive that was a surprise or that changed you?

I got really angry, and I– I felt obligated or entitled to my emotions for the first time, and I started breaking out of a shell. It was like I was disenchanted.

Q: Did you take any other classes during the summer intensive like movement or voice?

Yes, I took Movement 1, and Voice 1, and On-Camera Auditioning.

Summer Acting Programs Interview with Amilia Shaw at the Maggie Flanigan Studio

Q: How was that for you working during the movement and voice work simultaneously with the acting work?

It shouldn’t be done any other way. They’re so intertwined and interconnected. I’m over halfway through my first year here at Maggie Flanigan, and I’ve been taking– well, I took the first semester off of movement and voice because I did it over the summer, but now I’m back in Movement 2 and Voice 2. It’s such a relief to have that training on top of what we’re doing in the room because it’s everything that Charlie talks about in the room, it can be applied to what we do in movement and voice. Movement and voice are almost the same class in some regards because they’re also interconnected.

Q: Why did you decide to leave your college program and join the two-year program?

It was very much an in retrospect decision because while I was at the university I was at, I was absolutely in love with it, and I had the best year of my life, one of the best years in my life. And it wasn’t until I had been offered something I’d never been offered before when I came here that I needed to stay.

Q: How has it been working with Charlie? How do you describe him as a teacher?

Lots of people would say, “Charlie is so intimidating. He’s so scary.” I understand the perspective. I’m not scared of him. He repeatedly emphasizes that he only has our best interests in mind, and he has such a– what am I trying to say, a sense of right and wrong that it’s an inspiration to be in class with him, and you never feel like he is being belligerent for no reason.

It’s really touching actually how much individualized attention he gives us.

It’s nice because we’re becoming more tight-knit because we’re getting to know each other really well. I noticed that even with Charlie, we’re building more of a relationship. He is getting to know me even better and I’m getting to know him even better. That just makes the work even better because it becomes more of a team effort.

Meisner Summer Acting Program - Maggie Flanigan Studio 01

Meisner Summer Acting Programs – Meisner Summer Intensive – Call 917-789-1599

The Summer Acting Programs and the Meisner Intensive

To learn more about the summer acting program, the Meisner Intensive and the other acting programs at Maggie Flanigan Studio, visit the studio website online http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/ or call the front desk at 917-789-1599.

 

The post Summer Acting Program Interview – Amilia Shaw appeared first on Meisner Acting - The Maggie Flanigan Studio New York NY - 917-789-1599.

Spontaneity and the Meisner Technique

Actors who study the Meisner technique learn what it means to be spontaneous. In this video, Charlie Sandlan from the Maggie Flanigan Studio, discusses the importance of authentic behavior and the ability to be spontaneous. [caption id="attachment_9810" align="aligncenter" width="800"]spomtaneity maggie flanigan studio 01 (917) 789-1599 Spontaneity: Charlie Sandlan in Class - Maggie Flanigan Studio - Call (917) 789-1599[/caption] There are a number of fundamental skills that the Meisner Technique instills in actors. One of the most important is the ability to be spontaneous. It is an essential part of an actor’s capacity to create authentic, organic behavior. Aspiring actors who are coming to New York will often begin a search for acting classes that will challenge and inspire them to approach acting in an artistic and disciplined way. Meisner training has become one of the primary acting techniques in the United States because of its ability to ground an actor in the present moment, with the attention completely off themselves and onto the other, listening, and responding personally and spontaneously in every moment. That takes a full year to become second nature and cannot be learned in a film or scene study class. It is also possible to begin this training in a respected six-week summer Meisner intensive. [post_author] Professionally, a casting director may audition 200-300 actors for a major part. More than likely 280 of them will give the same audition, with the same clichéd line readings, and pedestrian behavior. The ability to craft personally, listen intently, and imaginatively interpret material is vital. What makes all of that work pay off in the experience of living it through is in the ability to respond spontaneously, out of your head, and impulsively free. That takes training and hard work to accomplish. True spontaneity in acting requires a stripping away of the socialization, education, and parenting that has instilled in us the habit of thinking before we speak. Dismantling this habit of withholding who we really are, of what we really feel, of breaking the tendency of apology and avoidance is one of the first major goals in a serious acting program. Spontaneity equals authenticity, and who you are, what makes you unique will not come to the surface without it. An actor who lacks spontaneity will hesitate. And hesitation makes it impossible to be impulsive. Your work will be cautious and dead. The beginning of the Meisner technique immediately begins to address the importance of listening, and responding spontaneously. If you are looking for NYC acting programs, you might consider starting with a six-week Meisner summer intensive. In six weeks, it is possible to work on yourself in a way that frees your instincts, grounds you in truth, and allows you the ability to listen and act on your spontaneous impulses. It is the bedrock of an actor’s craft. [caption id="attachment_9811" align="aligncenter" width="800"]spomtaneity maggie flanigan studio 02 (917) 789-1599 Spontaneity and the Meisner Technique - Acting Students in Class - Maggie Flanigan Studio Call (917) 789-1599[/caption]

Learn More About Maggie Flanigan Studio

To learn more about the Meisner Summer Intensive and summer acting program at the Maggie Flanigan Studio, visit the acting programs and acting classes page on the studio website http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/.

The preceding post Spontaneity and the Meisner Technique was first seen on Meisner Technique Blog

Spontaneity and the Meisner Technique

spomtaneity maggie flanigan studio 01 (917) 789-1599

Actors who study the Meisner technique learn what it means to be spontaneous. In this video, Charlie Sandlan from the Maggie Flanigan Studio, discusses the importance of authentic behavior and the ability to be spontaneous.

spomtaneity maggie flanigan studio 01 (917) 789-1599

Spontaneity: Charlie Sandlan in Class – Maggie Flanigan Studio – Call (917) 789-1599

There are a number of fundamental skills that the Meisner Technique instills in actors. One of the most important is the ability to be spontaneous. It is an essential part of an actor’s capacity to create authentic, organic behavior. Aspiring actors who are coming to New York will often begin a search for acting classes that will challenge and inspire them to approach acting in an artistic and disciplined way. Meisner training has become one of the primary acting techniques in the United States because of its ability to ground an actor in the present moment, with the attention completely off themselves and onto the other, listening, and responding personally and spontaneously in every moment. That takes a full year to become second nature and cannot be learned in a film or scene study class. It is also possible to begin this training in a respected six-week summer Meisner intensive.

author-pic

One of the most important skills that the Meisner Technique instills in actors is the ability to be spontaneous. This takes a full year to learn.

Charlie SandlanExecutive Director, Head of Acting

Professionally, a casting director may audition 200-300 actors for a major part. More than likely 280 of them will give the same audition, with the same clichéd line readings, and pedestrian behavior. The ability to craft personally, listen intently, and imaginatively interpret material is vital. What makes all of that work pay off in the experience of living it through is in the ability to respond spontaneously, out of your head, and impulsively free. That takes training and hard work to accomplish.

True spontaneity in acting requires a stripping away of the socialization, education, and parenting that has instilled in us the habit of thinking before we speak. Dismantling this habit of withholding who we really are, of what we really feel, of breaking the tendency of apology and avoidance is one of the first major goals in a serious acting program. Spontaneity equals authenticity, and who you are, what makes you unique will not come to the surface without it. An actor who lacks spontaneity will hesitate. And hesitation makes it impossible to be impulsive. Your work will be cautious and dead.

The beginning of the Meisner technique immediately begins to address the importance of listening, and responding spontaneously. If you are looking for NYC acting programs, you might consider starting with a six-week Meisner summer intensive. In six weeks, it is possible to work on yourself in a way that frees your instincts, grounds you in truth, and allows you the ability to listen and act on your spontaneous impulses. It is the bedrock of an actor’s craft.

spomtaneity maggie flanigan studio 02 (917) 789-1599

Spontaneity and the Meisner Technique – Acting Students in Class – Maggie Flanigan Studio Call (917) 789-1599

Learn More About Maggie Flanigan Studio

To learn more about the Meisner Summer Intensive and summer acting program at the Maggie Flanigan Studio, visit the acting programs and acting classes page on the studio website http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/.

The post Spontaneity and the Meisner Technique appeared first on Meisner Acting - The Maggie Flanigan Studio New York NY - 917-789-1599.

Summer Acting Program Interview - Amilia Shaw - Maggie Flanigan Studio


Watch video on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/H8wo0dh_69U
via Maggie Flanigan Studio

Spontaneity and the Meisner Technique - Maggie Flanigan Studio - Call (917) 789-1599


Watch video on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/VbJA5bTjX50
via Maggie Flanigan Studio

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Sam Rockwell: Rage and Vulnerability

studio talkback - sam rcokwell at maggie flanigan studio (917) 789-1599

Sam Rockwell is a trained Meisner actor who recently received an Oscar award for his performance in “Three Billboards OutSide Ebbing”. In this video Sam talks with students at Maggie Flanigan Studio about vulnerability and anger.

studio talkback - sam rcokwell at maggie flanigan studio (917) 789-1599

Studio Talkback – Sam Rockwell at Maggie Flanigan Studio – (917) 789-1599

It was long overdue, Sam Rockwell’s Oscar. His performance in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri was a nuanced, deeply vulnerable and compelling performance from one of this country’s consummate actors. His thirty-year career on both stage and screen has provided a generation of aspiring actors with a blueprint for approaching an artistic career. Sam is a Meisner trained actor. It’s apparent in how we works. His vulnerability, his imagination, his ability to be fully present in the moment, listening intently, and malleable to the nuances of human behavior is the mark of a very talented Meisner actor.

author-pic

"Underneath the rage is great sadness and vulnerability. I think that's a big key to emotional power."

Sam RockwellMeisner Trained Actor

Maggie Flanigan has been an important teacher and coach for Sam in his long career, and one day he came to our studio for a talkback with our students about craft and technique. One particular insight of his has stuck with me. He spoke insightfully about the importance of vulnerability. His Oscar winning performance as the police officer Dixon was a case study how to avoid superficial and clichéd choices. Most untrained actors not only lack craft, they do not possess an instrument that is capable of functioning from a sensitive, deeply empathic place. That takes serious professional actor training. Meisner believed that it was important to chisel away the socializing, parenting, and education that walls us up and keeps us defensive and guarded. The Meisner Technique accomplishes this in the first year of training.

Dixon, if portrayed by a less talented actor could have easily been carved into an angry, bigoted cliché, lacking depth and humanity. Anger can be an easy emotion to access, especially for men, and can be mistaken for intensity by young actors. Sam spoke of this, and it seemed prescient on his approach to the part. “The key to being a tough guy is actually vulnerability,” he said, “because under the rage that you see is vulnerability and hurt….under the rage is great sadness…that’s a big key to emotional power.” Dixon’s loneliness, his low self-esteem, his painful journey towards something redemptive was a tribute to Sam’s craft.

For those of you interested in a career as an actor, who may look to actors like Sam, Christian Bale, Idris Elba, Viola Davis, Daniel Day-Lewis, Jeffery Wright, Edie Falco and others as inspiration, go get trained. If you have questions about professional actor training, the Meisner Technique, or NYC acting programs, you might consider a six-week summer Meisner Intensive. This is the work that will begin to challenge you to be a more vulnerable and sensitive actor.

two year acting program - Maggie Flanigan (917) 789-1599

Professional Actor Training – Maggie Flanigan Studio – Call (917) 789-1599

Acting Programs and Meisner Training at the Maggie Flanigan Studio

Learn more about the Meisner training and the acting programs at the Maggie Flanigan Studio by visiting the studio website ( http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/ ) or by calling 917-789-1599 during studio hours.

The post Sam Rockwell: Rage and Vulnerability appeared first on Meisner Acting - The Maggie Flanigan Studio New York NY - 917-789-1599.