Saturday, January 13, 2018

Liked on YouTube: Two Year Acting Program - Gordon Winarick Interview - (917) 789-1599

Two Year Acting Program - Gordon Winarick Interview - (917) 789-1599
Best Two Year Acting Program http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/twoyearactingprogramnyc/ Two Year Meisner Acting Program - Maggie Flanigan Studio - Call (917) 789-1599 I haven't been acting for long, I've been acting for about two years which compared to some people who have grown up with theater, have been in theater their whole lives, I guess is pretty short. This is my first time studying Meisner through and through from beginning and other classes that I've taken they've used components and certain exercises but this is the first time that I've come to a studio to learn the Meisner technique and with nothing else mixed into it. I actually came across when I was studying the different kinds of techniques that were out there, I came across Meisner and there was a quote that said if you're a director or working with an actor who's trained in Meisner, it's a blessing and that made me dive deeper into it really trying to understand what it was about and why it was such a blessing that they said if you're working with that kind of actor why is it a blessing and it led me to read a few books and then I said, “There's something about the other person, what is this other person doing to you, what is other person doing to you?” That actually really calmed me down because prior to that, I had been very self-conscious and in my head actor and something about Meisner, putting your attention on someone else or what you're doing really just took a lot of stress and pressure off my shoulders. I didn't have an expectation of what this would be like because the only prior understanding I had of Meisner was from books. When I came here and started doing the exercises, to be honest at first I thought they were a little funny. I was like, “Why am I repeating back to this person, why am I doing this, why am I doing that?” Then all of a sudden it clicked and I started to really understand what we're learning here takes you from the fundamentals of acting and it's a really good base to build a career off of, is taking the time to learn the fundamentals and learn the Meisner technique. Two Year Acting Program - Gordon Winarick Interview - (917) 789-1599 I got back from London at the end of August and right when I came back I was still on such a high of studying and kind of just really just diving into what it means to be an actor and learning. I had looked at a couple other studios and something in my stomach just didn't really feel right. When I walked in here I remembered. I remember it was just yesterday. I walked in here and you take a look around and talking to you, talking to Charlie, talking with other students who are here. Then also looking at the videos online, I felt like I was home and that's that feeling, I will always go with my gut feeling. It's like my gut feeling is what brought me here. You learn so much more being around other people who are also practicing and also learning. You learn more about yourself by watching other people. I would also say, if you really want to do this for the rest of your life and you really want to make a career out of this, do work that you'd like to do. Two years is not a long time at all. It's worth every single penny that you'll spend on it. It's really worth every single second you're here because it's going to transform you from someone who can do scenes and someone who can act, to someone who's actually emotionally invested and ready to take on complicated material. Not everyone -- you haven't experienced everything in your life to be able to go and be every small character. That's what training is for. Learn More About the Two Year Program and Meisner Training To learn more about the Meisner Technique and the professional actor training that the studio provides, contact the Maggie Flanigan studio today by calling (917) 789-1599. Maggie Flanigan Studio 153 W 27th St #803 New York, New York 10001 +1 917-789-1599 http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/ https://goo.gl/maps/oxqqExybwL32 https://plus.google.com/100897218937179347163 ctwo year acting program, two year acting program in NYC, professional actor training program, meisner technique, acting programs, acting classes, 2 year acting program, two programs for actors, professional actor training
via YouTube https://youtu.be/3cJ_zAIyu8g

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Reframing the Fear of Failure and Criticism

Acting programs and acting classes at the Maggie Flanigan Studio in New York are based on teaching the Meisner Technique as Sanford Meisner intended. In this discussion, Eden Marryshow and Charlie Sandlan discuss the fear that many actors have that prevent them from receiving the training needed for a long professional acting career. [caption id="attachment_9559" align="aligncenter" width="800"]two year acting program - Maggie Flanigan (917) 789-1599 Two Year Acting Program - Maggie Flanigan (917) 789-1599[/caption]

The Fear of Failure and Criticism

Charlie: You know, I have been a teacher for a long time. I've interviewed thousands of students, taught many, many people. It is always surprising to me how prevalent fear is. How it can keep people from pursuing their dreams, from committing to something that might seem very daunting and scary. I'm just wondering what your thoughts are about that.

Did you experience that kind of fear when you made a commitment to the two-year program?

Eden: Yes, definitely. Definitely felt fear, continue to feel fear, continue to feel that fear of failure, yes. Reframing it to me means, it has to go from failing to feedback. If we can take our egos out of it and if we can take the emotion out of it, if we take the elevator music out of it and we can look at it for what it is, it's feedback. Charlie: The fear of feedback. Eden: Yes, the fear of criticism, failure, or failure in general, is feedback. If I fail, like I did with the Superman thing, I can say, "Oh, that was wrong. Let me re-adjust myself,". It all then goes back to the idea of having a north star. [post_author]

What do you think people could accomplish if they were guaranteed that they wouldn't be criticized?

Eden: Everything. Right? Charlie: Brené Brown talks about that a lot if you listen to her at all. Eden: That's right. Yes. I love Brené Brown. I mentioned her in "Bruce". Charlie: That's right. Eden: Yes. Again, I've definitely experienced a ton of fear, a ton of fear of failure. I was at the Board of Education for 10 years of my life. From 18 to 28. One of my dreams was to work with my dad, which I had the pleasure of doing, but from 18 to 28, I went to Brooklyn College for film production, got all my film credits and then was like, "I'm good,". I started making my own little movies and people would say that they were good, all that, but my own sense of it is like, not thinking that I was good enough, is also another thing. Again, I say this all the time, people we know are all consumed with being perfect, but perfect comes from the Latin - Charlie: Yes, art's not, you can't be perfect in anything. Eden: Nothing is perfect. It comes from the Latin "perfectus" which means complete, we're all born imperfect. It's just this weird thing where we're searching outside of ourselves, right? But it's here. Also, for 10 years doing that and being scared, and daydreaming with my friend Marcell when we will go to the Chinese spot, at Wendy's or McDonald's or whatever, driving at lunchtime and then just like sitting back and dreaming about what life would be if I actually did take a shot, take a chance. That's 10 years of my life. It was really scary, the prospects of doing that. We all experience that. There are people that will tell you that you can't make it. I have something to say to the people that are scared of people judging them. Anybody that tells you, "You can't do it," has never gone after anything in their life. Or they've gone after it and they stopped. Nicole who went to Maggie's, randomly ran into Daniel Day-Lewis, all like -- You remember that, Kate? Ran into Daniel Day-Lewis on like 23rd and 6th and he walked all the way with her to Washington Park. Charlie: I remember her talking about that and they had a conversation -- Eden: And he -- This is the dude. Charlie: Talking about giving back, paying forward, like to have a conversation with him. Eden: Yes, to have that conversation. He told her, "You can do it. I'm not going to say it's easy." He saw something he was trying to do it too and he was like, "But you can do it." Anybody that's gone after anything, and enjoyed the journey, is not going to tell you that you can't do it.

What do you say to somebody who's sitting in front of the computer and they're like, "I want to be an actor? I know, I think I need training. I'm just not sure if I've got the time or the money."

Eden: It'll come. Charlie: - about money, and going into debt. It freaks them out, man. It just freaks them out and they just -- They get crushed by fear. Eden: That's right. Follow your freak out. If you're freaking out, it's probably a good thing. I believe that intuition, fear can be a good thing. If you feel that fear, that's the path. Who goes and watches a movie where the middle of the movie, the heroine is not falling flat on their face? Who wants to see the beginning of the movie, life is great, and the end of the movie, life is great, the middle of the movie, life is great? It's the idea of, when you feel that fear, you jump in. You know from now on, that is your intuition saying, "We have to go that way,", and that's part of the reframing. If you're watching this right now, you're watching it for a reason. Come, interview, check it out. I'm not getting paid. Charlie: I know. Eden: You know what I mean? Well, seriously though, this is really serious. I love this studio. I love Charlie Sandlan, I love Katie Healy, I love Maggie Flanigan. I am indebted to them for life, for the craft that I have gotten and I have received. If people out there, even if it's yourself, you don't know s***. Never have a broke person tell you how to get rich. If you are broke in this whole acting thing, you don't even know what the f*** you're talking -- Excuse me, my language. You don't even know what you're talking about. Press us in, send an email. Do it. If you commit, if you give your all, it will happen. I had $2500 in the bank when we decided to make Bruce. It was a hundred and forty-three page, the first draft that a bunch of people told us it wasn't anything. They told us it was crap. I was frustrated. I was like, "I'm going to make this.", and what did I do? Because I am smart when it comes to certain things, I got all of my Maggie Flanigan friends. I was like, "You know what, this script might not be the best, but I have a bunch of friends who know how to work and who will figure stuff out for me and do the work.". I had about 25, maybe, $3000 to make a feature film, and because of favors and love and craft, people started to jump on the train. People love to jump on a moving train. [caption id="attachment_9560" align="aligncenter" width="800"]eden marry show talks about following his fear and enrolling in an acting program Acting Program - Eden Marryshow - Maggie Flanigan Studio 01 - (917) 789-1599[/caption] Charlie: Because people believe in you. Because you speak and have such a positive energy around you. Eden: Thank you, Charlie. Charlie: You know what I mean? That's what I love about you, because not only are you a talented actor and you're serious, but you give so much to people. Eden: Thank you. Charlie: You've spent all of your days trying to help people become better. Eden: That was what I'm obsessed with. I believe - Charlie: And look, I mean, your life just continues to take off. The world just keeps bringing stuff back to you. Eden: It does, it's crazy.

What would you say to people that are worried about the money and worried about life?

Charlie: I tell students because they're freaked out, they don't want to take all these classes, I say, "Listen, if you're going to start a business, you have to invest in it. If that business is you and your body and your craft," but it scares people. They won't do it. They'll put it off until all the stars are aligned. Eden: Exactly. Charlie: The stars are never going to be aligned. Eden: They'll never going to be aligned. Charlie: What do you say to people like that? Eden: It's the pine box rule. Charlie: Pine box rule? Eden: Yes. Basically, mainly for me, it's just like, "Am I going to be thinking about this when they put that moment before I get put in that box and get buried in the ground?" No, I'm not. Charlie: I'm going to steal that. Eden: Yes, please do. For me, for a lot of this stuff, that's what it's about. It's like, "The money will come." If you think about the how, the aligning of the stars, like how am I going to do something, that's not your work. Whatever you believe in, God, the universe, that's its work. Your work is figuring out like, "Look, this is what I want to do with my life. This is how I'm going to grow the universe." I don't believe in this idea that God is a stagnant thing, the universe is a stagnant thing. I believe it's growing with all of us. Right? The idea is if we're committed to growth, it's always going to support, the universe always supports dreamers. There is a safety net. There will be. I had no money when I started the Maggie Flanigan Studio. I had no money when I was starting Bruce. Right? I say, had a little bit of money before I started Maggie Flanigan but then, it all went away because I wasn't going on on auditions as much. I committed fully to doing this. Money came. The money will always come. I had 53 cents in the bank, I think. [caption id="attachment_9561" align="aligncenter" width="800"]eden marry show talks with Charlie Sandlan about the two year acting program and acting classes at the studio Eden Marryshow at ABFF Awards - Professional Acting Programs - Maggie Flanigan Studio - (917) 789-1599[/caption] Charlie: I remember you talking-- Eden: Yes. We are going to complete -- We were editing, finishing, trying to finish up the editing of Bruce and I had ¢53 in the bank, and we owed about almost $6,000 in rent. We have never been late in our rent before, ever. Cesa is like, "Eden, you know you're going to have to get, probably, have to get a job." And I hadn't had a job in years because I've been working as an actor, which is amazing. Doing like dream big, go hard. I was like, "Oh man. I have to get a job, and figure this out." but I wanted to finish my movie. So, I'm talking to my friend, one day, and I look in her eyes, like literally that afternoon, I look in her eyes and I'm telling the story and there's something in her eyes that was just like, no, and I was like you'd be a hypocrite. I was like I'm going to do the only thing I know how to do, which is to go home and work on my film and trust that the universe will be there. Long story a little shorter, I get a call to go on a voice over audition. I end up booking in like the next three days, a National Bacardi spot. Voice over became like the voice of Bacardi, for that season. That was it, it just happens. I'm not special. I mean I'm special, but we're all special. It's not like, it's not rocket science, it's just idea, the scariest thing is to jump in. If you do it it will happen, if you're watching television and you're like this guy's a hack, or this woman's a hack, or this one has no talent, you shut the f*** up and do something. Charlie: That's right because you're not in the arena, right? As Brene Brown said you're not in the arena. Eden: And before her Teddy Roosevelt, which was the speech that Eric Kooner made in a lesson in our voice two class, which was my introduction to it, and I was like dude, who said that I'm about that. The man in the arena, you know, was a bunch of critics, who are going to be woman enough, to jump in and say let's get it. Charlie: That's right. [caption id="attachment_9449" align="aligncenter" width="800"]acting program - maggie flanigan studio 01 - (917) 789-1599 Acting Program - Students in the Two Year Acting Program -Maggie Flanigan Studio - (917) 789-1599[/caption]

Apply for Admission to the Maggie Flanigan Studio

Apply today for admission to the acting programs and acting classes at the Maggie Flanigan Studio. Admission to the studio is based on an interview with Charlie Sandlan, the executive director. Call the studio with any question you have about our acting classes, two-year programs, and summer acting programs or visit the studio website (http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/).

The above article Reframing the Fear of Failure and Criticism See more on: Meisner Technique New York Blog

Reframing the Fear of Failure and Criticism

acting programs for professional actors - eden marryshow discusses the deciosn to train at the studio and man\king "Bruce"

Acting programs and acting classes at the Maggie Flanigan Studio in New York are based on teaching the Meisner Technique as Sanford Meisner intended. In this discussion, Eden Marryshow and Charlie Sandlan discuss the fear that many actors have that prevent them from receiving the training needed for a long professional acting career.

two year acting program - Maggie Flanigan (917) 789-1599

Two Year Acting Program – Maggie Flanigan (917) 789-1599

The Fear of Failure and Criticism

Charlie: You know, I have been a teacher for a long time. I’ve interviewed thousands of students, taught many, many people. It is always surprising to me how prevalent fear is. How it can keep people from pursuing their dreams, from committing to something that might seem very daunting and scary. I’m just wondering what your thoughts are about that.

Did you experience that kind of fear when you made a commitment to the two-year program?

Eden: Yes, definitely. Definitely felt fear, continue to feel fear, continue to feel that fear of failure, yes. Reframing it to me means, it has to go from failing to feedback. If we can take our egos out of it and if we can take the emotion out of it, if we take the elevator music out of it and we can look at it for what it is, it’s feedback.

Charlie: The fear of feedback.

Eden: Yes, the fear of criticism, failure, or failure in general, is feedback. If I fail, like I did with the Superman thing, I can say, “Oh, that was wrong. Let me re-adjust myself,”. It all then goes back to the idea of having a north star.

author-pic

If you're freaking out, it's probably a good thing. I believe that intuition, fear can be a good thing. If you feel that fear, that's the path.

Eden MarryshowTwo Year Acting Program, Alumni

What do you think people could accomplish if they were guaranteed that they wouldn’t be criticized?

Eden: Everything. Right?

Charlie: Brené Brown talks about that a lot if you listen to her at all.

Eden: That’s right. Yes. I love Brené Brown. I mentioned her in “Bruce”.

Charlie: That’s right.

Eden: Yes. Again, I’ve definitely experienced a ton of fear, a ton of fear of failure. I was at the Board of Education for 10 years of my life. From 18 to 28. One of my dreams was to work with my dad, which I had the pleasure of doing, but from 18 to 28, I went to Brooklyn College for film production, got all my film credits and then was like, “I’m good,”.

I started making my own little movies and people would say that they were good, all that, but my own sense of it is like, not thinking that I was good enough, is also another thing. Again, I say this all the time, people we know are all consumed with being perfect, but perfect comes from the Latin –

Charlie: Yes, art’s not, you can’t be perfect in anything.

Eden: Nothing is perfect. It comes from the Latin “perfectus” which means complete, we’re all born imperfect. It’s just this weird thing where we’re searching outside of ourselves, right? But it’s here. Also, for 10 years doing that and being scared, and daydreaming with my friend Marcell when we will go to the Chinese spot, at Wendy’s or McDonald’s or whatever, driving at lunchtime and then just like sitting back and dreaming about what life would be if I actually did take a shot, take a chance. That’s 10 years of my life. It was really scary, the prospects of doing that.

We all experience that. There are people that will tell you that you can’t make it. I have something to say to the people that are scared of people judging them. Anybody that tells you, “You can’t do it,” has never gone after anything in their life. Or they’ve gone after it and they stopped. Nicole who went to Maggie’s, randomly ran into Daniel Day-Lewis, all like — You remember that, Kate? Ran into Daniel Day-Lewis on like 23rd and 6th and he walked all the way with her to Washington Park.

Charlie: I remember her talking about that and they had a conversation —

Eden: And he — This is the dude.

Charlie: Talking about giving back, paying forward, like to have a conversation with him.

Eden: Yes, to have that conversation. He told her, “You can do it. I’m not going to say it’s easy.” He saw something he was trying to do it too and he was like, “But you can do it.” Anybody that’s gone after anything, and enjoyed the journey, is not going to tell you that you can’t do it.

What do you say to somebody who’s sitting in front of the computer and they’re like, “I want to be an actor? I know, I think I need training. I’m just not sure if I’ve got the time or the money.”

Eden: It’ll come.

Charlie: – about money, and going into debt. It freaks them out, man. It just freaks them out and they just — They get crushed by fear.

Eden: That’s right. Follow your freak out. If you’re freaking out, it’s probably a good thing. I believe that intuition, fear can be a good thing. If you feel that fear, that’s the path. Who goes and watches a movie where the middle of the movie, the heroine is not falling flat on their face? Who wants to see the beginning of the movie, life is great, and the end of the movie, life is great, the middle of the movie, life is great? It’s the idea of, when you feel that fear, you jump in. You know from now on, that is your intuition saying, “We have to go that way,”, and that’s part of the reframing. If you’re watching this right now, you’re watching it for a reason. Come, interview, check it out. I’m not getting paid.

Charlie: I know.

Eden: You know what I mean? Well, seriously though, this is really serious. I love this studio. I love Charlie Sandlan, I love Katie Healy, I love Maggie Flanigan. I am indebted to them for life, for the craft that I have gotten and I have received. If people out there, even if it’s yourself, you don’t know s***. Never have a broke person tell you how to get rich. If you are broke in this whole acting thing, you don’t even know what the f*** you’re talking — Excuse me, my language. You don’t even know what you’re talking about. Press us in, send an email. Do it. If you commit, if you give your all, it will happen.

I had $2500 in the bank when we decided to make Bruce. It was a hundred and forty-three page, the first draft that a bunch of people told us it wasn’t anything. They told us it was crap. I was frustrated. I was like, “I’m going to make this.”, and what did I do? Because I am smart when it comes to certain things, I got all of my Maggie Flanigan friends. I was like, “You know what, this script might not be the best, but I have a bunch of friends who know how to work and who will figure stuff out for me and do the work.”. I had about 25, maybe, $3000 to make a feature film, and because of favors and love and craft, people started to jump on the train. People love to jump on a moving train.

eden marry show talks about following his fear and enrolling in an acting program

Acting Program – Eden Marryshow – Maggie Flanigan Studio 01 – (917) 789-1599

Charlie: Because people believe in you. Because you speak and have such a positive energy around you.

Eden: Thank you, Charlie.

Charlie: You know what I mean? That’s what I love about you, because not only are you a talented actor and you’re serious, but you give so much to people.

Eden: Thank you.

Charlie: You’ve spent all of your days trying to help people become better.

Eden: That was what I’m obsessed with. I believe –

Charlie: And look, I mean, your life just continues to take off. The world just keeps bringing stuff back to you.

Eden: It does, it’s crazy.

What would you say to people that are worried about the money and worried about life?

Charlie: I tell students because they’re freaked out, they don’t want to take all these classes, I say, “Listen, if you’re going to start a business, you have to invest in it. If that business is you and your body and your craft,” but it scares people. They won’t do it. They’ll put it off until all the stars are aligned.

Eden: Exactly.

Charlie: The stars are never going to be aligned.

Eden: They’ll never going to be aligned.

Charlie: What do you say to people like that?

Eden: It’s the pine box rule.

Charlie: Pine box rule?

Eden: Yes. Basically, mainly for me, it’s just like, “Am I going to be thinking about this when they put that moment before I get put in that box and get buried in the ground?” No, I’m not.

Charlie: I’m going to steal that.

Eden: Yes, please do. For me, for a lot of this stuff, that’s what it’s about. It’s like, “The money will come.” If you think about the how, the aligning of the stars, like how am I going to do something, that’s not your work. Whatever you believe in, God, the universe, that’s its work. Your work is figuring out like, “Look, this is what I want to do with my life. This is how I’m going to grow the universe.” I don’t believe in this idea that God is a stagnant thing, the universe is a stagnant thing. I believe it’s growing with all of us. Right? The idea is if we’re committed to growth, it’s always going to support, the universe always supports dreamers. There is a safety net. There will be. I had no money when I started the Maggie Flanigan Studio. I had no money when I was starting Bruce. Right? I say, had a little bit of money before I started Maggie Flanigan but then, it all went away because I wasn’t going on on auditions as much. I committed fully to doing this. Money came. The money will always come. I had 53 cents in the bank, I think.

eden marry show talks with Charlie Sandlan about the two year acting program and acting classes at the studio

Eden Marryshow at ABFF Awards – Professional Acting Programs – Maggie Flanigan Studio 02 – (917) 789-1599

Charlie: I remember you talking–

Eden: Yes. We are going to complete — We were editing, finishing, trying to finish up the editing of Bruce and I had ¢53 in the bank, and we owed about almost $6,000 in rent. We have never been late in our rent before, ever. Cesa is like, “Eden, you know you’re going to have to get, probably, have to get a job.” And I hadn’t had a job in years because I’ve been working as an actor, which is amazing. Doing like dream big, go hard.

I was like, “Oh man. I have to get a job, and figure this out.” but I wanted to finish my movie. So, I’m talking to my friend, one day, and I look in her eyes, like literally that afternoon, I look in her eyes and I’m telling the story and there’s something in her eyes that was just like, no, and I was like you’d be a hypocrite. I was like I’m going to do the only thing I know how to do, which is to go home and work on my film and trust that the universe will be there.

Long story a little shorter, I get a call to go on a voice over audition. I end up booking in like the next three days, a National Bacardi spot. Voice over became like the voice of Bacardi, for that season. That was it, it just happens. I’m not special. I mean I’m special, but we’re all special. It’s not like, it’s not rocket science, it’s just idea, the scariest thing is to jump in. If you do it it will happen, if you’re watching television and you’re like this guy’s a hack, or this woman’s a hack, or this one has no talent, you shut the f*** up and do something.

Charlie: That’s right because you’re not in the arena, right? As Brene Brown said you’re not in the arena.

Eden: And before her Teddy Roosevelt, which was the speech that Eric Kooner made in a lesson in our voice two class, which was my introduction to it, and I was like dude, who said that I’m about that. The man in the arena, you know, was a bunch of critics, who are going to be woman enough, to jump in and say let’s get it.

Charlie: That’s right.

acting program - maggie flanigan studio 01 - (917) 789-1599

Acting Program – Students in the Two Year Acting Program -Maggie Flanigan Studio – (917) 789-1599

Apply for Admission to the Maggie Flanigan Studio

Apply today for admission to the acting programs and acting classes at the Maggie Flanigan Studio. Admission to the studio is based on an interview with Charlie Sandlan, the executive director. Call the studio with any question you have about our acting classes, two-year programs, and summer acting programs or visit the studio website (http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/).

The post Reframing the Fear of Failure and Criticism appeared first on Meisner Acting - The Maggie Flanigan Studio New York NY - 917-789-1599.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Fear and the Creative Struggle

two year acting program - maggie flanigan studio

Over the holiday vacation, I had the real pleasure of sitting down to talk with one of my former students Eden Marryshow about life after training at the Maggie Flanigan Studio. The subject of fear came up in our conversation, and how it cripples us from taking the chances that put us on the path towards achieving our dreams. I’ve been thinking a lot about this as I begin the new year interviewing those interested in pursuing a professional acting career.

author-pic

Nothing of value can be gained if you are not willing to operate outside of your comfort zone.

Charlie SandlanExecutive Director, Head of Acting

There is a common thread that appears in many of my talks with prospective students, namely the fear that has been holding them back from taking themselves and their life dreams seriously. Our dreams are very personal, and often lie dormant inside of us for many, many years. To make the decision to take the first step towards realizing this dream can be terrifying. How relatable are these thoughts: “My parents don’t support this, they’d kill me if I told them I am going to pursue an acting career.”, “How can I commit to two years of training, I’m scared that opportunities will pass me by?”, “It’s too much money, I ‘m afraid of getting into debt.”, “What if I’m not talented, I’m scared of failing?”, “I don’t know how I could fit in 20 hours of training a week and still work to support myself? I’m afraid I’ll have to leave NYC and go back home.”


Nothing of value can be gained if you are not willing to operate outside of your comfort zone. This is where real growth and possibility exists. If you are one of the lucky few that are deeply passionate about a life in the arts and have a smoldering dream to become a first-rate actor and artist, then you must be willing to risk yourself. Art demands this commitment. What do you think you could accomplish if you were guaranteed that you would not fail or be criticized? These two monsters will keep you always wondering, what if. What if I just jumped off the cliff and took my dreams seriously? What if I put myself in the position of being a beginner again in order to learn something substantial? What if I committed to working harder than anyone I know? What if I cut out all of the relationships in my life that made me question and doubt myself? What if I surrounded myself with talented, hard-working, passionate people? What if I said yes?

two year acting program - maggie flanigan studio

Charlie Sandlan and Eden Marryshow – Maggie Flanigan Studio (917) 789-1599

If you have a dream, pursue it relentlessly. Demand the best version of you. Embrace hard work and self-discipline. And open your heart to the beauty of creative struggle.

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Fear and the Creative Struggle

Over the holiday vacation, I had the real pleasure of sitting down to talk with one of my former students Eden Marryshow about life after training at the Maggie Flanigan Studio. The subject of fear came up in our conversation, and how it cripples us from taking the chances that put us on the path towards achieving our dreams. I’ve been thinking a lot about this as I begin the new year interviewing those interested in pursuing a professional acting career. [post_author] There is a common thread that appears in many of my talks with prospective students, namely the fear that has been holding them back from taking themselves and their life dreams seriously. Our dreams are very personal, and often lie dormant inside of us for many, many years. To make the decision to take the first step towards realizing this dream can be terrifying. How relatable are these thoughts: “My parents don’t support this, they’d kill me if I told them I am going to pursue an acting career.”, “How can I commit to two years of training, I’m scared that opportunities will pass me by?”, “It’s too much money, I ‘m afraid of getting into debt.”, “What if I’m not talented, I’m scared of failing?”, “I don’t know how I could fit in 20 hours of training a week and still work to support myself? I’m afraid I’ll have to leave NYC and go back home.” Nothing of value can be gained if you are not willing to operate outside of your comfort zone. This is where real growth and possibility exists. If you are one of the lucky few that are deeply passionate about a life in the arts and have a smoldering dream to become a first-rate actor and artist, then you must be willing to risk yourself. Art demands this commitment. What do you think you could accomplish if you were guaranteed that you would not fail or be criticized? These two monsters will keep you always wondering, what if. What if I just jumped off the cliff and took my dreams seriously? What if I put myself in the position of being a beginner again in order to learn something substantial? What if I committed to working harder than anyone I know? What if I cut out all of the relationships in my life that made me question and doubt myself? What if I surrounded myself with talented, hard-working, passionate people? What if I said yes? [caption id="attachment_9536" align="aligncenter" width="800"]two year acting program - maggie flanigan studio Charlie Sandlan and Eden Marryshow - Maggie Flanigan Studio (917) 789-1599[/caption] If you have a dream, pursue it relentlessly. Demand the best version of you. Embrace hard work and self-discipline. And open your heart to the beauty of creative struggle.

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Reframing the Fear of Failure and Criticism - Maggie Flanigan Studio - Call (917) 789-1599


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