Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Awareness. Acceptance. Allowance.

movement classes for actors - maggie studio - Sara Fay George

Sara Fay George teaches movement classes for actors at the Maggie Flanigan Studio in New York. In this blog post, Sara discusses the different levels of the creative process.

movement classes for actors - maggie studio - Sara Fay George

Movement Classes for Actors – Maggie Studio – Sara Fay George

Awareness. Acceptance. Allowance. Although deceivingly simple these, three principles create the foundation of any prosperous, creative process. Once initiated, this cycle creates a perpetual motion of honesty, spontaneity, and expression that springs from a deep, genuine place within the artist.

Awareness exists in us on different levels; emotional experiences, physical tensions, and repeating thought and life patterns. Consciousness works like magic: it is the light that allows us to perceive. Without it we would live in darkness, unaware of ourselves, unaware of each other. Without awareness, we are not able to change, but when we hone our awareness, quiet our minds, and bring our focus and attention to whatever is within or before us, the creative work can truly begin.

author-pic

"Within each of us, there is an infinite well of life and inspiration. We can always move deeper, be more honest, truthful, expressive, creative."

Sara Fay GeorgeMovement Class, Faculty

On the road to honing this awareness, there are common tendencies that are important to be aware of. Judgment creates one of the most fore-running barriers to our creative work and can stop our process even before we begin. This brings us to the importance of acceptance. Acceptance is defined as the action of consenting to receive or undertake something offered. In acting, the processing of raw and powerful states of emotion must happen continuously and instantaneously. As artists, it is our calling to take our raw experiences and translate them through different mediums, be it paint, clay, or in the actor’s case, motion and sound. We spend an extreme amount of energy fighting and resisting our experiences. Before we can give an experience our full expression, we must welcome it with open arms no matter how extreme, intense, or painful.  This is when the practice of acceptance comes into play. We consent to receive what is offered to us in a moment. Once we are no longer fighting our experience, our energy is free to move into forms of expression.

Allowing. This is where the real magic takes place and is perhaps the most overlooked. To create the most truthful performance, we must step out of our way. Often I see students in patterns of striving for intense emotional experiences. They want to cry, to lose themselves in the depth of their own emotion, but it is precisely the tension created by this grasping effort that keeps them from the goal they so long for. Allowance is about giving yourself permission to live the truth of the moment. All the emotional life you could ever dream of is already inside of you. You do not need to create it, manufacture it, or push it. You need to allow it. This opening, in combination with awareness and acceptance, begins to create a cycle and flow of energy in the artist.

When we have an intimate connection with ourselves, our creative expression evolves. We begin to tap into parts of ourselves that had lain hidden in the shadows, resulting in a transformation of our art and craft. This self-exploration sets our energy free, and we are then able to tap into deeper roots of expression and inspiration without any extraneous effort.  What is so beautiful about this process is that it never stops. Within each of us, there is an infinite well of life and inspiration. We can always move deeper, be more honest, truthful, expressive, creative. We must take the dive, and we will find ourselves alive.

movement classes for actors - maggie studio - sara fay george

Movement Class for Actors with Sara Fay George – Maggie Flanigan Studio in New York

Movement Classes at the Maggie Flanigan Studio

Learn more about movement classes at the Maggie Flanigan Studio by visiting the acting programs and classes page on the studio website. Students who are interested in applying for admission can start their application process online.

The post Awareness. Acceptance. Allowance. appeared first on Meisner Acting - The Maggie Flanigan Studio New York NY - 917-789-1599.

Monday, March 4, 2019

Awareness. Acceptance. Allowance.

Sara Fay George teaches movement classes for actors at the Maggie Flanigan Studio in New York. In this blog post, Sara discusses the different levels of the creative process.

Awareness. Acceptance. Allowance. Although deceivingly simple these, three principles create the foundation of any prosperous, creative process. Once initiated, this cycle creates a perpetual motion of honesty, spontaneity, and expression that springs from a deep, genuine place within the artist.

Awareness exists in us on different levels; emotional experiences, physical tensions, and repeating thought and life patterns. Consciousness works like magic: it is the light that allows us to perceive. Without it we would live in darkness, unaware of ourselves, unaware of each other. Without awareness, we are not able to change, but when we hone our awareness, quiet our minds, and bring our focus and attention to whatever is within or before us, the creative work can truly begin.

On the road to honing this awareness, there are common tendencies that are important to be aware of. Judgment creates one of the most fore-running barriers to our creative work and can stop our process even before we begin. This brings us to the importance of acceptance. Acceptance is defined as the action of consenting to receive or undertake something offered. In acting, the processing of raw and powerful states of emotion must happen continuously and instantaneously. As artists, it is our calling to take our raw experiences and translate them through different mediums, be it paint, clay, or in the actor's case, motion and sound. We spend an extreme amount of energy fighting and resisting our experiences. Before we can give an experience our full expression, we must welcome it with open arms no matter how extreme, intense, or painful.  This is when the practice of acceptance comes into play. We consent to receive what is offered to us in a moment. Once we are no longer fighting our experience, our energy is free to move into forms of expression.

Allowing. This is where the real magic takes place and is perhaps the most overlooked. To create the most truthful performance, we must step out of our way. Often I see students in patterns of striving for intense emotional experiences. They want to cry, to lose themselves in the depth of their own emotion, but it is precisely the tension created by this grasping effort that keeps them from the goal they so long for. Allowance is about giving yourself permission to live the truth of the moment. All the emotional life you could ever dream of is already inside of you. You do not need to create it, manufacture it, or push it. You need to allow it. This opening, in combination with awareness and acceptance, begins to create a cycle and flow of energy in the artist.

When we have an intimate connection with ourselves, our creative expression evolves. We begin to tap into parts of ourselves that had lain hidden in the shadows, resulting in a transformation of our art and craft. This self-exploration sets our energy free, and we are then able to tap into deeper roots of expression and inspiration without any extraneous effort.  What is so beautiful about this process is that it never stops. Within each of us, there is an infinite well of life and inspiration. We can always move deeper, be more honest, truthful, expressive, creative. We must take the dive, and we will find ourselves alive.

Movement Classes at the Maggie Flanigan Studio

Learn more about movement classes at the Maggie Flanigan Studio by visiting the acting programs and classes page on the studio website. Students who are interested in applying for admission can start their application process online.

The above article Awareness. Acceptance. Allowance. is courtesy of Meisner Technique New York NY

The Creative Process - Sara Gay George - Maggie Flanigan Studio


Watch video on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/UOGLTPo1dr0
via Maggie Flanigan Studio

Sunday, February 24, 2019

Alumni News: Meg Hennessy

The Maggie Flanigan Studio congratulates studio alumni, Meg Hennessy. Meg has the role of Minnie in "The Shadow of a Gunman" at the Irish Repertory Theater.

Review: "The Shadow of a Gunman" at the Irish Repertory Theater, Meg Hennessy

“The Shadow of a Gunman,” Sean O’Casey’s tragicomic 1923 play about gun violence, patriotism and empty rhetoric, has returned to the Irish Repertory Theater, the first production in a season devoted to his work. And like most Irish Rep shows, there’s little interest in reinterrogating the play: This is a revival, not a reinvention.

Instead, the director Ciaran O’Reilly aims to show how playable “The Shadow of a Gunman” remains. Its context — the Irish war of independence — won’t be especially familiar to most audiences, but the idea of people fighting and dying for beliefs they may understand only imperfectly isn’t exactly dated.

O’Casey, a luminary of the Anglo-Irish renaissance, was a satiro-comic writer with a big-time dark side and an enduring faith in human self-deception. He practiced the kind of realism in which you can smell how filthy the sheets are. Despite the comedy, the Dublin slum-dwellers who populate his plays are fully realized characters, not shabby cartoons, and he had a cocked ear for the absurd poetry of their speech. He also knew how quickly and ruinously a joke might go wrong, how comedy can in an instant turn its face to tragedy.

In “The Shadow of a Gunman,” Donal Davoren (James Russell), a would-be poet, and Seumas Shields (Michael Mellamphy), a threadbare peddler with I.R.A. sympathies, share a grungy tenement room. During an ordinary morning, Seumas’s friend Mr. Maguire, an I.R.A. gunman, comes to drop off a bag, and Seumas tells Donal that everyone in the building thinks Donal is a gunman on the run. Donal doesn’t hate the idea, especially when Minnie Powell (Meg Hennessy), the Republican babe a few rooms over, implies that she finds gunmen sexy. “What danger can there be in being the shadow of a gunman,” he wonders to himself. Maybe he should look inside Maguire’s bag.

Mr. O’Reilly’s production doesn’t hit any of the themes too hard. If he does locate the brutality in much of the comedy, he treats a grim play lightly. If you’re worried that you may not find gun violence especially funny, just lean back and luxuriate in the language. (The accents may take a minute to suss; you’ll get there.) Besides, the Irish Rep remains one of the most reliable places to enjoy rowdy, all-in character acting, and it’s here in plenty. The Irish Rep’s great clown John Keating, an exuberant string bean with a shock of curly hair, is nearly upstaged by Ed Malone, a younger actor built along the same pleasantly absurd lines and a deft physical comedian. Robert Langdon Lloyd does fine work, too.

But when the play takes its uncorrectable skid into tragedy, there’s enough dramatic force to make you feel for the characters, even the ones you laughed at. At nearly 100 years old, O’Casey’s play still packs heat.

This review for 'The Shadow of a Gunman' first appeared here: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/12/theater/the-shadow-of-a-gunman-review-irish-rep.html

The previous post Alumni News: Meg Hennessy was first published on Meisner Technique New York

Alumni News: Meg Hennessy

Meg Hennessy - Alumni News - Maggie Flanigan Studio 03

The Maggie Flanigan Studio congratulates studio alumni, Meg Hennessy. Meg has the role of Minnie in “The Shadow of a Gunman” at the Irish Repertory Theater.

Meg Hennessy - Alumni News - Maggie Flanigan Studio 03

Meg Hennessy – Alumni News – Maggie Flanigan Studio

Review: “The Shadow of a Gunman” at the Irish Repertory Theater, Meg Hennessy

“The Shadow of a Gunman,” Sean O’Casey’s tragicomic 1923 play about gun violence, patriotism and empty rhetoric, has returned to the Irish Repertory Theater, the first production in a season devoted to his work. And like most Irish Rep shows, there’s little interest in reinterrogating the play: This is a revival, not a reinvention.

author-pic

“Meg Hennessy is an engaging Minnie, sweet and passionate enough to make even the silliest of poets rise up and take arms.”

NEWSWEEK

Instead, the director Ciaran O’Reilly aims to show how playable “The Shadow of a Gunman” remains. Its context — the Irish war of independence — won’t be especially familiar to most audiences, but the idea of people fighting and dying for beliefs they may understand only imperfectly isn’t exactly dated.

O’Casey, a luminary of the Anglo-Irish renaissance, was a satiro-comic writer with a big-time dark side and an enduring faith in human self-deception. He practiced the kind of realism in which you can smell how filthy the sheets are. Despite the comedy, the Dublin slum-dwellers who populate his plays are fully realized characters, not shabby cartoons, and he had a cocked ear for the absurd poetry of their speech. He also knew how quickly and ruinously a joke might go wrong, how comedy can in an instant turn its face to tragedy.

In “The Shadow of a Gunman,” Donal Davoren (James Russell), a would-be poet, and Seumas Shields (Michael Mellamphy), a threadbare peddler with I.R.A. sympathies, share a grungy tenement room. During an ordinary morning, Seumas’s friend Mr. Maguire, an I.R.A. gunman, comes to drop off a bag, and Seumas tells Donal that everyone in the building thinks Donal is a gunman on the run. Donal doesn’t hate the idea, especially when Minnie Powell (Meg Hennessy), the Republican babe a few rooms over, implies that she finds gunmen sexy. “What danger can there be in being the shadow of a gunman,” he wonders to himself. Maybe he should look inside Maguire’s bag.

Mr. O’Reilly’s production doesn’t hit any of the themes too hard. If he does locate the brutality in much of the comedy, he treats a grim play lightly. If you’re worried that you may not find gun violence especially funny, just lean back and luxuriate in the language. (The accents may take a minute to suss; you’ll get there.) Besides, the Irish Rep remains one of the most reliable places to enjoy rowdy, all-in character acting, and it’s here in plenty. The Irish Rep’s great clown John Keating, an exuberant string bean with a shock of curly hair, is nearly upstaged by Ed Malone, a younger actor built along the same pleasantly absurd lines and a deft physical comedian. Robert Langdon Lloyd does fine work, too.

Meg Hennessy - Alumni News - Maggie Flanigan Studio 01

Meg Hennessy – ‘The Shadow of a Gunman’ – Maggie Flanigan Studio

But when the play takes its uncorrectable skid into tragedy, there’s enough dramatic force to make you feel for the characters, even the ones you laughed at. At nearly 100 years old, O’Casey’s play still packs heat.

This review for ‘The Shadow of a Gunman’ first appeared here: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/12/theater/the-shadow-of-a-gunman-review-irish-rep.html

The post Alumni News: Meg Hennessy appeared first on Meisner Acting - The Maggie Flanigan Studio New York NY - 917-789-1599.

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

The Unavoidable Meisner Process

The New York summer acting program at the Maggie Flanigan Studio includes the Six-Week Meisner Summer Intensive. The acting intensive is based on the training that Sanford Meisner created to teach professional actors. Here in this video, Andrel McPherson discusses the acting program.

Andrel McPherson Interview: New York Summer Acting Program

Q: Andrel, what did you think it meant to train as an actor before you started the Six-Week Summer Intensive at the Maggie Flanigan Studio?

A: I thought it was about taking your own time to read as many plays as possible, studying other actors and then getting on stage and just figuring it out for yourself and hoping that a moment happens or you feel something by yourself. I had no idea nor did I ever imagine that it would take so much of myself to bring it out there then, which makes sense. Before you started doing work like this, you think that you're doing that and then when you start doing it, it's like, "Oh my gosh, that's a lot more work than I thought it would be."

Q: Well, what do you think it means now to train?

A: Making everything so personal for yourself and being able to focus tremendously on, not yourself, but what everyone else is giving you in the moment, which is hard because you're always in your head. You're trying to make sure that you're giving the best to them, but then you have to feel it and be in that moment, paying attention to every single detail which is exhausting when you're starting off this type of training. I guess just the most significant thing I've taken away from this is trying to pay attention to my point of view and how I'm feeling in a moment and how I can express that improv through whatever.

Q: What happened throughout the six weeks that changed your perspective on acting and training?

A: Charlie going off on me. It was exactly what I needed. Not because I didn't realize, I did not know that it would take that much out of me until someone was just like, "You're giving us a lot of bull, let's not do that anymore." Then there was this moment where I'm like, "Crap, but no, I want this. I want to try." Then you continue to dig deeper and deeper in yourself. That's when you find one little nugget of something, and it's like, "Okay. I see it now. I see what he was talking about." A lot of those good moments.

Q: What did you learn about yourself, that was a surprise or that changed you?

A: How willing I am to be open? I wasn't expecting myself to allow so much of someone else to come into me just because that's not how the world works. We're huge on trying to protect everything that we have. To know that I have it in me to pay attention and to experience what someone else is feeling and giving me was honestly just-- It's so exciting.

Q: Now that you've just trained for the past six weeks with the Meisner technique what resonates with you the most?

A: Process, really and truly, knowing that there has to be one and there's just no way around it because everything else in life has a process. I don't know why I thought that I couldn't be any different.

I'm so mad about myself. I've wasted so much time, but it's okay.

Q: A lot of people do have that misconception about being an actor.

A: Exactly. Yes, the process would be it for me. It's so exciting to know that there is one and it's working for me. It's not just something I made up on my own. It's like there is tradition behind it. There's the reasoning behind it. There's an explanation for everything as to why you should do it and why you shouldn't. It's literally like you're given a map to go out and have fun.

Q: You're also a writer. How has what you've learned throughout these six weeks helped you as a writer and not just an actor?

A: I don't write about what I don't care about anymore if that makes sense. It's straightforward to get caught up in writing what you think you should be writing about. If anything, I learned in Meisner that what I think I care about and what I care about are two completely different things. It's been nice to see myself be a lot rawer and honest with what I'm writing and not being so afraid to put it on the page and being comfortable with all ugly sides of myself, all pretty sides, just like every form that there is in me.

Q: You've also studied at other studios with other teachers. What's been the most significant difference between Maggie Flanigan and other studios?

A: The attention and the dedication to not caring about ego and just being there and putting in the work to make sure that I'm putting in my work. It's easy at other places that I've trained at to get lost in the crowd there. Charlie was just so adamant about giving everyone their time and making sure that you had what you needed. He wasn't trying to do it off of the whole class. It's an individual. It helped you grow in the way that you needed to build, and not necessarily in what other people may need.

Here, there has been so much attention, so much specificity as to what I needed which is what I came here for. It's been great just having someone and a group of artists, able to hone in on what I could bring out of myself.

Q: What about the sense of community within your class?

A: They're my family. I love so many of them now. It's been- oh, gosh. I love them. I do. I can't believe-- For one, it's bizarre now that we can talk about whatever we want to because you break down so many of the walls. In the first two weeks, you'll cry [laughs] for whatever reason. That was just like, "You know things about me that my own family doesn't know about me." It's been so rewarding to be a part of this environment, which is another reason why I love acting. You're always steadily building a new family. I have another one now.

Q: How would you describe Charlie as a teacher?

A: Charlie is fantastic. He is so tough. You will walk away from some classes feeling down, but you have to remember that it's never out of place of malice. He's just really not going to give you any crap about what he thinks that you need. The man knows what he's doing, I think, at least from my perspective. He's been so tough when needed, but also so soft when I needed him to.

It's almost scary where he knows the line. Like right when I'm like really getting into my head, that's when he'll say something that I need to hear. He is good at balancing, and I would say — a great, great person to learn from.

Q: What would you say to someone who says, "Oh, I don't need more training," or, "It's too expensive?

A: If you think you don't need class then I'm sorry for you. You always need to be training. Always. Even the greats say that. You can't ever stop, ever. If you don't think you have the money, that's such a hard thing, but it's worth it. I guess, really worth it. I know in the beginning, I was like, "Oh my God. Am I doing this? Am I about to drop this money?" Now, here I am and I would drop it all over again if I had it and if I could. Every time, I would. It's been so giving to what I'm trying to work towards. It's been more so an investment thing like, "Is it worth the money?"

Q: You are moving to LA in a few weeks?

A: Yes.

Q: How do you feel going out there? Do you feel more confident than you did six weeks ago?

Interviewee: I feel excited, very excited to know that now I have this other part of me to bring over there. I also have the knowledge that I want to keep training. I'm going out there, and I'm not just going to be doing what I was doing before and just sitting around and waiting for a blessing to fall on my lap. It's a good feeling to know that I'm going over somewhere else with all this energy, all this excitement, and I'm pumped. Yes, I'm excited for sure.

The New York Summer Acting Program at the Maggie Flanigan Studio

Learn more about the New York Summer Acting Program at the Maggie Flanigan studio by visiting the acting program and acting classes page on the studio website ( https://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/ ). Actors who are interested in the programs at the studio should apply online and call the studio with questions by calling (917) 789-1599.

The preceding article The Unavoidable Meisner Process is courtesy of www.maggieflaniganstudio.com

The Unavoidable Meisner Process

Summer Acting Program - Andrel McPherson - Maggie Flanigan Studio 01

The New York summer acting program at the Maggie Flanigan Studio includes the Six-Week Meisner Summer Intensive. The acting intensive is based on the training that Sanford Meisner created to teach professional actors. Here in this video, Andrel McPherson discusses the acting program.

New York Summer Acting Program - Andrel McPherson - Maggie Flanigan Studio 02

New York Summer Acting Program – Andrel McPherson – Maggie Flanigan Studio 02

Andrel McPherson Interview: New York Summer Acting Program

Q: Andrel, what did you think it meant to train as an actor before you started the Six-Week Summer Intensive at the Maggie Flanigan Studio?

A: I thought it was about taking your own time to read as many plays as possible, studying other actors and then getting on stage and just figuring it out for yourself and hoping that a moment happens or you feel something by yourself. I had no idea nor did I ever imagine that it would take so much of myself to bring it out there then, which makes sense. Before you started doing work like this, you think that you’re doing that and then when you start doing it, it’s like, “Oh my gosh, that’s a lot more work than I thought it would be.”

Q: Well, what do you think it means now to train?

A: Making everything so personal for yourself and being able to focus tremendously on, not yourself, but what everyone else is giving you in the moment, which is hard because you’re always in your head. You’re trying to make sure that you’re giving the best to them, but then you have to feel it and be in that moment, paying attention to every single detail which is exhausting when you’re starting off this type of training. I guess just the most significant thing I’ve taken away from this is trying to pay attention to my point of view and how I’m feeling in a moment and how I can express that improv through whatever.

author-pic

It's so exciting to know that there is process to acting and it's working for me. The process has a reasoning and tradition behind it. It is not just something I made up on my own.

Andrel McPhersonNew York Summer Acting Program

Q: What happened throughout the six weeks that changed your perspective on acting and training?

A: Charlie going off on me. It was exactly what I needed. Not because I didn’t realize, I did not know that it would take that much out of me until someone was just like, “You’re giving us a lot of bull, let’s not do that anymore.” Then there was this moment where I’m like, “Crap, but no, I want this. I want to try.” Then you continue to dig deeper and deeper in yourself. That’s when you find one little nugget of something, and it’s like, “Okay. I see it now. I see what he was talking about.” A lot of those good moments.

Q: What did you learn about yourself, that was a surprise or that changed you?

A: How willing I am to be open? I wasn’t expecting myself to allow so much of someone else to come into me just because that’s not how the world works. We’re huge on trying to protect everything that we have. To know that I have it in me to pay attention and to experience what someone else is feeling and giving me was honestly just– It’s so exciting.

Q: Now that you’ve just trained for the past six weeks with the Meisner technique what resonates with you the most?

A: Process, really and truly, knowing that there has to be one and there’s just no way around it because everything else in life has a process. I don’t know why I thought that I couldn’t be any different.

I’m so mad about myself. I’ve wasted so much time, but it’s okay.

Q: A lot of people do have that misconception about being an actor.

A: Exactly. Yes, the process would be it for me. It’s so exciting to know that there is one and it’s working for me. It’s not just something I made up on my own. It’s like there is tradition behind it. There’s the reasoning behind it. There’s an explanation for everything as to why you should do it and why you shouldn’t. It’s literally like you’re given a map to go out and have fun.

New York Summer Acting Program - The Meisner Summer Intensive Begins

New York Summer Acting Program – The 2019 Meisner Summer Intensive Begins

Q: You’re also a writer. How has what you’ve learned throughout these six weeks helped you as a writer and not just an actor?

A: I don’t write about what I don’t care about anymore if that makes sense. It’s straightforward to get caught up in writing what you think you should be writing about. If anything, I learned in Meisner that what I think I care about and what I care about are two completely different things. It’s been nice to see myself be a lot rawer and honest with what I’m writing and not being so afraid to put it on the page and being comfortable with all ugly sides of myself, all pretty sides, just like every form that there is in me.

Q: You’ve also studied at other studios with other teachers. What’s been the most significant difference between Maggie Flanigan and other studios?

A: The attention and the dedication to not caring about ego and just being there and putting in the work to make sure that I’m putting in my work. It’s easy at other places that I’ve trained at to get lost in the crowd there. Charlie was just so adamant about giving everyone their time and making sure that you had what you needed. He wasn’t trying to do it off of the whole class. It’s an individual. It helped you grow in the way that you needed to build, and not necessarily in what other people may need.

Here, there has been so much attention, so much specificity as to what I needed which is what I came here for. It’s been great just having someone and a group of artists, able to hone in on what I could bring out of myself.

Q: What about the sense of community within your class?

A: They’re my family. I love so many of them now. It’s been- oh, gosh. I love them. I do. I can’t believe– For one, it’s bizarre now that we can talk about whatever we want to because you break down so many of the walls. In the first two weeks, you’ll cry [laughs] for whatever reason. That was just like, “You know things about me that my own family doesn’t know about me.” It’s been so rewarding to be a part of this environment, which is another reason why I love acting. You’re always steadily building a new family. I have another one now.

New York Summer Acting Program - Andrel McPherson - Maggie Flanigan Studio 01

New York Summer Acting Program – Andrel McPherson – Maggie Flanigan Studio 01

Q: How would you describe Charlie as a teacher?

A: Charlie is fantastic. He is so tough. You will walk away from some classes feeling down, but you have to remember that it’s never out of place of malice. He’s just really not going to give you any crap about what he thinks that you need. The man knows what he’s doing, I think, at least from my perspective. He’s been so tough when needed, but also so soft when I needed him to.

It’s almost scary where he knows the line. Like right when I’m like really getting into my head, that’s when he’ll say something that I need to hear. He is good at balancing, and I would say — a great, great person to learn from.

Q: What would you say to someone who says, “Oh, I don’t need more training,” or, “It’s too expensive?

A: If you think you don’t need class then I’m sorry for you. You always need to be training. Always. Even the greats say that. You can’t ever stop, ever. If you don’t think you have the money, that’s such a hard thing, but it’s worth it. I guess, really worth it. I know in the beginning, I was like, “Oh my God. Am I doing this? Am I about to drop this money?” Now, here I am and I would drop it all over again if I had it and if I could. Every time, I would. It’s been so giving to what I’m trying to work towards. It’s been more so an investment thing like, “Is it worth the money?”

Q: You are moving to LA in a few weeks?

A: Yes.

Q: How do you feel going out there? Do you feel more confident than you did six weeks ago?

Interviewee: I feel excited, very excited to know that now I have this other part of me to bring over there. I also have the knowledge that I want to keep training. I’m going out there, and I’m not just going to be doing what I was doing before and just sitting around and waiting for a blessing to fall on my lap. It’s a good feeling to know that I’m going over somewhere else with all this energy, all this excitement, and I’m pumped. Yes, I’m excited for sure.

New York Summer Acting Program - Maggie Flanigan Studio 01

Summer Acting Program – Maggie Flanigan Studio

The New York Summer Acting Program at the Maggie Flanigan Studio

Learn more about the New York Summer Acting Program at the Maggie Flanigan studio by visiting the acting program and acting classes page on the studio website ( https://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com/ ). Actors who are interested in the programs at the studio should apply online and call the studio with questions by calling (917) 789-1599.

The post The Unavoidable Meisner Process appeared first on Meisner Acting - The Maggie Flanigan Studio New York NY - 917-789-1599.