Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Louisa Proske – “This“ Play by Melissa James Gibson

In a light-filled rehearsal studio, director Louisa Proske confers quietly with two actors. They are working their way through the linguistic twists and turns of Melissa James Gibson’s “This,” a tartly funny drama about a group of friends navigating the onset of middle age. [caption id="attachment_8989" align="aligncenter" width="800"]Louisa Proske Directs “This“ Play by Melissa James Gibson Louisa Proske Directs “This“ Play by Melissa James Gibson[/caption] Julia Coffey and Mark Dold are seated as their director offers notes about trusting the playwright’s language and letting it carry them through the play. They’ve been working on an intense scene between the two characters, who are old friends. “I feel energized by that,” Coffey says. “I’m totally drained,” Dold counters quietly. Their physical responses may differ, but they look right in synch on stage. The new rehearsal studio, with its exposed brick and green views of the nearby Berkshire hills, sits above a space that was a showroom for office furniture before Barrington Stage Company renovated it this year into its new production center and administrative offices. “This” begins performances at the company’s Mark St. Germain Stage on Thursday. Gibson’s play first bowed off-Broadway to some effusive praise in 2009. Since then she’s added to her resume the high-profile job as one of two showrunners for the Netflix series “House of Cards” alongside plaudits from the theater world, like her Obie Award for writing the play “[sic].” “This” looks at a group of college friends entering their 40s. Jane (Coffey) is a semi-successful poet haunted by a personal loss. Marrell (Erica Dorfler) and Tom (Eddie Boroevich) are new parents starting to wither under the pressure of their child’s sleep disorder, which causes the baby to doze in short increments of about 15 minutes. Alan (Dold) is a single man who seems to be questioning his place in this group as the lives of his peers change dramatically. Also in the mix is Jean-Pierre (Paris Remillard), a dashing French doctor who Marrell and Tom would like to fix up with Jane. “Somehow these people are all trying to ask themselves: How do I get out of who I’ve become? How do I experience real freedom?” Proske says, seated with Coffey and Dold in the building’s airy lobby. Proske speaks with just the hint of an accent that tips off her upbringing in Berlin. “And that has to do with doing the unexpected,” she continues, “with contradicting a bit of who you’ve become and how the others around you see you.” [caption id="attachment_8990" align="aligncenter" width="800"]Play by Melissa James Gibson Louisa Proske Directs Play by Melissa James Gibson[/caption] Proske is coming off recent successes with Heartbeat Opera, the company she co-founded in New York City that has attracted favorable attention for its radical reinventions of classic material, arranged for chamber ensembles. It’s her third time directing at Barrington Stage, and though the thematic connection is accidental it’s tempting to see “This” as the third in a trio of smartly observed, semi-dark comedies she’s helmed here that all have something to say about generational angst. Lucy Teitler’s “Engagements,” whose world premiere Proske directed at Barrington Stage in 2015, deals with the mixed feelings of folks in their mid-to-late 20s who feel left behind as they watch their friends get married. Last summer, Jiehae Park’s “Peerless” offered a scathing look at the pressures on teens applying for college. Those plays were grounded in contemporary realities but had some highly stylized elements. The pure straightforwardness of “This” is a bit of a stretch for Proske. “I rarely do living room pieces,” she says, “with all the trappings of washing dishes and keys and doorbells and all that. So this is new for me: How do you do a degree of naturalism? But then there is this incredible musicality in the language that I really relate to.” The playwright’s style in this piece is signaled by the apparent simplicity, or even throwaway nature, of the play’s title. The script is very carefully wrought to realistically simulate the speech patterns among a group of friends — within the intimacy of one-on-one conversations as well as when thoughts are Ping-Ponging among five people. The playwright uses lots of creative punctuation and capitalization, with unusual line breaks. It can be tricky to suss out the script’s rhythms and bring the words to life as something that sounds natural and not mannered. “I’m so dazzled by the complexity of her writing when it seems so simple,” Dold says. Proske also notes the several long speeches in the play. “Each of the characters has this intense use of language that we refer to as arias, where suddenly there’s this intense need to talk a lot,” she says. Coffey and Dold are each about the age of the characters they play. They say their own life experiences are essential to understanding Jane and Alan. “I don’t think I could have played this part a couple of years ago,” Coffey says. “I think there’s an element of a paralysis that sometimes happens at different points in your life where something happens and all of a sudden you don’t know how to deal with it or you find yourself not performing at your best. That is not something we celebrate in humanity — when we don’t meet our expectations. I think it’s brave to put it on the stage.” Dold has a similar view. The power of acting notwithstanding, life has a way of offering different people similar lessons at particular moments in time — for better or worse. “You couldn’t be a younger actor with these characters,” he says. “Maybe you could, but you’d have to be faking the jadedness and the disappointment and the loss and the yearning — the stuff that starts to happen with middle age when you start to look back and forward at the same time.” This article originally appeared here: https://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/theater/dance/2017/08/01/middle-age-affliction-barrington-stage-this/b9v09cDZElHnCP3DBGpc6I/story.html

The next article Louisa Proske – “This“ Play by Melissa James Gibson was originally published to Maggie Flanigan Acting Studio Blog Read more on: www.maggieflaniganstudio.com

Louisa Proske – “This“ Play by Melissa James Gibson

Louisa Proske Directs “This“ Play by Melissa James Gibson

In a light-filled rehearsal studio, director Louisa Proske confers quietly with two actors. They are working their way through the linguistic twists and turns of Melissa James Gibson’s “This,” a tartly funny drama about a group of friends navigating the onset of middle age.

Louisa Proske Directs “This“ Play by Melissa James Gibson

Louisa Proske Directs “This“ Play by Melissa James Gibson

Julia Coffey and Mark Dold are seated as their director offers notes about trusting the playwright’s language and letting it carry them through the play. They’ve been working on an intense scene between the two characters, who are old friends. “I feel energized by that,” Coffey says. “I’m totally drained,” Dold counters quietly. Their physical responses may differ, but they look right in synch on stage.

The new rehearsal studio, with its exposed brick and green views of the nearby Berkshire hills, sits above a space that was a showroom for office furniture before Barrington Stage Company renovated it this year into its new production center and administrative offices. “This” begins performances at the company’s Mark St. Germain Stage on Thursday.

Gibson’s play first bowed off-Broadway to some effusive praise in 2009. Since then she’s added to her resume the high-profile job as one of two showrunners for the Netflix series “House of Cards” alongside plaudits from the theater world, like her Obie Award for writing the play “[sic].”

“This” looks at a group of college friends entering their 40s. Jane (Coffey) is a semi-successful poet haunted by a personal loss. Marrell (Erica Dorfler) and Tom (Eddie Boroevich) are new parents starting to wither under the pressure of their child’s sleep disorder, which causes the baby to doze in short increments of about 15 minutes. Alan (Dold) is a single man who seems to be questioning his place in this group as the lives of his peers change dramatically. Also in the mix is Jean-Pierre (Paris Remillard), a dashing French doctor who Marrell and Tom would like to fix up with Jane.

“Somehow these people are all trying to ask themselves: How do I get out of who I’ve become? How do I experience real freedom?” Proske says, seated with Coffey and Dold in the building’s airy lobby. Proske speaks with just the hint of an accent that tips off her upbringing in Berlin. “And that has to do with doing the unexpected,” she continues, “with contradicting a bit of who you’ve become and how the others around you see you.”

Play by Melissa James Gibson

Louisa Proske Directs Play by Melissa James Gibson

Proske is coming off recent successes with Heartbeat Opera, the company she co-founded in New York City that has attracted favorable attention for its radical reinventions of classic material, arranged for chamber ensembles.

It’s her third time directing at Barrington Stage, and though the thematic connection is accidental it’s tempting to see “This” as the third in a trio of smartly observed, semi-dark comedies she’s helmed here that all have something to say about generational angst. Lucy Teitler’s “Engagements,” whose world premiere Proske directed at Barrington Stage in 2015, deals with the mixed feelings of folks in their mid-to-late 20s who feel left behind as they watch their friends get married. Last summer, Jiehae Park’s “Peerless” offered a scathing look at the pressures on teens applying for college.

Those plays were grounded in contemporary realities but had some highly stylized elements. The pure straightforwardness of “This” is a bit of a stretch for Proske. “I rarely do living room pieces,” she says, “with all the trappings of washing dishes and keys and doorbells and all that. So this is new for me: How do you do a degree of naturalism? But then there is this incredible musicality in the language that I really relate to.”

The playwright’s style in this piece is signaled by the apparent simplicity, or even throwaway nature, of the play’s title. The script is very carefully wrought to realistically simulate the speech patterns among a group of friends — within the intimacy of one-on-one conversations as well as when thoughts are Ping-Ponging among five people. The playwright uses lots of creative punctuation and capitalization, with unusual line breaks. It can be tricky to suss out the script’s rhythms and bring the words to life as something that sounds natural and not mannered.

“I’m so dazzled by the complexity of her writing when it seems so simple,” Dold says. Proske also notes the several long speeches in the play. “Each of the characters has this intense use of language that we refer to as arias, where suddenly there’s this intense need to talk a lot,” she says.

Coffey and Dold are each about the age of the characters they play. They say their own life experiences are essential to understanding Jane and Alan.

“I don’t think I could have played this part a couple of years ago,” Coffey says. “I think there’s an element of a paralysis that sometimes happens at different points in your life where something happens and all of a sudden you don’t know how to deal with it or you find yourself not performing at your best. That is not something we celebrate in humanity — when we don’t meet our expectations. I think it’s brave to put it on the stage.”

Dold has a similar view. The power of acting notwithstanding, life has a way of offering different people similar lessons at particular moments in time — for better or worse.

“You couldn’t be a younger actor with these characters,” he says. “Maybe you could, but you’d have to be faking the jadedness and the disappointment and the loss and the yearning — the stuff that starts to happen with middle age when you start to look back and forward at the same time.”

This article originally appeared here: https://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/theater/dance/2017/08/01/middle-age-affliction-barrington-stage-this/b9v09cDZElHnCP3DBGpc6I/story.html

The post Louisa Proske – “This“ Play by Melissa James Gibson appeared first on Meisner Acting - The Maggie Flanigan Studio New York NY - 917-789-1599.

Two Year Acting Program – Xandra Leigh Parker

When it comes to the Meisner technique, the Maggie Flanigan Studio is considered by many to be the most professional and most respected actor training program in the United States. In this interview, Xandra Leigh Parker discusses what it has been like to study in the two year acting program at the studio. [caption id="attachment_8977" align="aligncenter" width="800"]meisner technique two year acting program xandra leigh parker 02 Meisner  Two Year Acting Program - Xandra Leigh Parker[/caption]

How did you make the choice to study in a small selective training program like this?

I think it's turned out great. I get plenty of time in class. I get to work on all different thing. I get to work with everybody. You get to really know everybody and it becomes a very familiar safe environment because of that, and it gives you the freedom to do things you didn't know you were capable or ready to do. I think it's worked out really wonderfully for me. [post_author]

And Maggie Flanigan Studio has a reputation for teaching in each student's particular needs, how have you personally experienced this approach here at the studio, whether it's an acting class or any of the auxiliary classes you're involved in?

I think that's the importance of the two-year program, is that Charlie, specifically, will get to know you very well and be able to dig in there and work with you as you slowly lose the blocks that you have. I think it's important because it's such a long program you get to really get all those individual things to it, I guess.

And do you feel like you're being challenged and critiqued based on your specific issues?

Absolutely. I'm starting to feel what Charlie's talking about before he's about to say it, so I think it's starting to slowly fall away, which is really nice. I think he absolutely tailors each person's critiques to what they're specifically needing to work on, absolutely.

And your class, in particular, is very tight-knit, not just the acting class, students that are taking similar classes, how has that been for you in class and in the studio?

Amazing. It's like I have a new family a little bit. Everybody's super supportive of each other in class and out, and we hold each other accountable and push each other. I think it's an extremely nurturing environment because of how tight-knit we are.

And you're enrolled in the professional actor training program, how do you think, taking all of the auxiliary classes, you're just in your first year, but how do you see that already benefiting you in the acting class?

Immensely, not even just in my acting classes but also in life, because I'm taking a lot of the self-wellness classes as well. I think that things you might have thought you had a good grasp on, it's amazing how much I didn't know and how much I've instituted that in the rest of my life. I think that the whole program builds on itself very well. I'm not even sure how to say this. I think that they all slowly aid the acting program without you realizing it until you're about halfway through and you start to see all the little things falling together.

You had worked previously before you came in here, what ultimately made you decide to come and study and commit to this program, take time out in career and really commit to training?

I felt like I didn't have a solid way of working yet. I had pieces, but I didn't have a solid foundation to really being able to go in and do my best work. If I was doing good work, it was almost out of chance and not out of professional training. I think that the decision to go back to school was by far the best one. I've seen how I would have approached roles before much differently and almost wish I could go back and do it again. I also think that my life experience with the training program has been really beneficial for me, I'm glad I'm hitting it at this time, definitely.

How do you think both Charlie and your classmates have helped you raise your standard for yourself? What you're willing to commit to the project you're working on, the roles you are developing, how have they helped you raise your standard?

Once you have one of those classes that you feel completely accelerated, you want it more and more and more. It's almost like you want to one-up yourself. It's not a competition with your classmates, but you want to make sure that you're constantly pushing and constantly striving to do something that scares you because that feeling is unfakeable, I think, and has been some of the scariest classes but also the best things that I was terrified to do, even to approach as a subject, have been monumentally helpful. [caption id="attachment_8976" align="aligncenter" width="800"]meisner technique two year acting program xandra leigh parker 03 Meisner Technique Two Year Acting Program - Xandra Leigh Parker[/caption]

And compared to other places you've studied or taken classes, how do they compare to Maggie Flanigan Studio?

The dedication is different. Everybody here who I've worked with is here for the right reasons. They want this. They're willing to work for it, and that's just unlike a lot of studios I was in. The percentage of people who are there for the right reasons, who are really here to train to be a real artist, to make brave and bold choices and to take it seriously. I think that's a major difference. And you feel safe here to try that stuff.

How have Charlie and the other teachers at Maggie Flanigan Studio supported your individual growth?

I think it's very individual. I feel like I have a specific relationship with each of my teachers. They teach each student slightly differently to what they need. I think it's absolutely individualized, and I think that's my favorite thing about it. My relationship with my teachers is much different than another student's, and that's how it should be.

What would you say to someone that is maybe a friend that has been working in the business for a while but hasn't really committed to training or they feel like they're stuck or maybe someone you've just met at a workshop and they're maybe toying or thinking about committing to a two-year program specifically, maybe not your learning in studio?

I would say, going back to school is a very hard decision for me because I was worried that I was taking a step back. But at the same time, I felt like I didn't have the fundamentals and at least in the beginning of the year no matter how frustrating the fundamentals are, and they definitely were, I think it's built a much more solid foundation for myself to try scary things, and I think that's the thing I would say to people who are thinking about doing that. If you don't have a solid foundation, how do you build a career? So I'd say, "Absolutely. Jump in and do it." This is the place for me.

Well, you're finishing up your first year right now and you're going to be heading into the second year in the fall, are you excited? How do you feel about that?

I'm very excited. We've gotten little tidbits that second years haven't given everything away, but I'm really excited to try all of the things that we keep hearing whispers about and keep pushing and keep pushing. So, yes, I'm very excited for the second year.

So, Xandra, a few students who you began the first year with, in September, is no longer here, what does that say about the program, the passion, and the dedication it takes to become a serious actor?

I think this program focuses on artistry, first and foremost, and taking chances, but it also focuses on work ethic. There's a lot demanded of you and most of it is on yourself. And, of course, the classes require you to build on it, but if you're not working for yourself, then you're not really doing anything. I think that this program so far has also trained me to push, and push, and push and always work hard. Charlie warned us at the beginning that that was the main thing we're going to have to do, it's just to work as hard as possible. And he was right. I don't think I've ever worked as hard in a program before, and I'm really glad that I am.

And what would you say to a fellow actor who's out there auditioning, maybe not booking, they're working and want to be booking, that's afraid that training will take away their authenticity, or put them in their head, or take away what makes them special. That coming to a program like this would get in the way that. What would you say to them?

I think that this program helps you explore your individuality. If anything, it Kind of illuminates it for yourself. I've discovered a lot more about myself and my own issues with acting or blocks that I've given myself all my tension and what that means for me as a person. I think that it helps you open up your individuality more than anything else. You have a better idea of who you are as a person, and what you believe, and what things really strike you. I think, if anything, it's the opposite. [caption id="attachment_8537" align="aligncenter" width="800"]two year acting program - maggie flanigan studio 2017 01 The Two Year Acting Program at Maggie Flanigan Studio Begins January 3rd. Serious Actors Should Call to Arrange an Interview. Call (917) 789-1599.[/caption]

Two Year Acting Program: Schedule an Interview

To learn more about the Meisner technique and the two-year acting program at the Maggie Flanigan studio, visit us online or call the studio during regular business hours at 917-789-1599.

The following post Two Year Acting Program – Xandra Leigh Parker was originally published to Maggie Flanigan Acting Studio Blog See more on: http://www.maggieflaniganstudio.com

Two Year Acting Program – Xandra Leigh Parker

xandra leigh parker0 two year acting program

When it comes to the Meisner technique, the Maggie Flanigan Studio is considered by many to be the most professional and most respected actor training program in the United States. In this interview, Xandra Leigh Parker discusses what it has been like to study in the two year acting program at the studio.

meisner technique two year acting program xandra leigh parker 02

Meisner  Two Year Acting Program – Xandra Leigh Parker

How did you make the choice to study in a small selective training program like this?

I think it’s turned out great. I get plenty of time in class. I get to work on all different thing. I get to work with everybody. You get to really know everybody and it becomes a very familiar safe environment because of that, and it gives you the freedom to do things you didn’t know you were capable or ready to do. I think it’s worked out really wonderfully for me.

author-pic

It's like I have a new family. Everyone here is super supportive of each other in class and out. We hold each other accountable and push each other. It is an extremely nurturing environment.

Xandra Leigh ParkerTwo Year Acting Program

And Maggie Flanigan Studio has a reputation for teaching in each student’s particular needs, how have you personally experienced this approach here at the studio, whether it’s an acting class or any of the auxiliary classes you’re involved in?

I think that’s the importance of the two-year program, is that Charlie, specifically, will get to know you very well and be able to dig in there and work with you as you slowly lose the blocks that you have. I think it’s important because it’s such a long program you get to really get all those individual things to it, I guess.

And do you feel like you’re being challenged and critiqued based on your specific issues?

Absolutely. I’m starting to feel what Charlie’s talking about before he’s about to say it, so I think it’s starting to slowly fall away, which is really nice. I think he absolutely tailors each person’s critiques to what they’re specifically needing to work on, absolutely.

And your class, in particular, is very tight-knit, not just the acting class, students that are taking similar classes, how has that been for you in class and in the studio?

Amazing. It’s like I have a new family a little bit. Everybody’s super supportive of each other in class and out, and we hold each other accountable and push each other. I think it’s an extremely nurturing environment because of how tight-knit we are.

And you’re enrolled in the professional actor training program, how do you think, taking all of the auxiliary classes, you’re just in your first year, but how do you see that already benefiting you in the acting class?

Immensely, not even just in my acting classes but also in life, because I’m taking a lot of the self-wellness classes as well. I think that things you might have thought you had a good grasp on, it’s amazing how much I didn’t know and how much I’ve instituted that in the rest of my life. I think that the whole program builds on itself very well. I’m not even sure how to say this. I think that they all slowly aid the acting program without you realizing it until you’re about halfway through and you start to see all the little things falling together.

You had worked previously before you came in here, what ultimately made you decide to come and study and commit to this program, take time out in career and really commit to training?

I felt like I didn’t have a solid way of working yet. I had pieces, but I didn’t have a solid foundation to really being able to go in and do my best work. If I was doing good work, it was almost out of chance and not out of professional training. I think that the decision to go back to school was by far the best one. I’ve seen how I would have approached roles before much differently and almost wish I could go back and do it again. I also think that my life experience with the training program has been really beneficial for me, I’m glad I’m hitting it at this time, definitely.

How do you think both Charlie and your classmates have helped you raise your standard for yourself? What you’re willing to commit to the project you’re working on, the roles you are developing, how have they helped you raise your standard?

Once you have one of those classes that you feel completely accelerated, you want it more and more and more. It’s almost like you want to one-up yourself. It’s not a competition with your classmates, but you want to make sure that you’re constantly pushing and constantly striving to do something that scares you because that feeling is unfakeable, I think, and has been some of the scariest classes but also the best things that I was terrified to do, even to approach as a subject, have been monumentally helpful.

meisner technique two year acting program xandra leigh parker 03

Meisner Technique Two Year Acting Program – Xandra Leigh Parker

And compared to other places you’ve studied or taken classes, how do they compare to Maggie Flanigan Studio?

The dedication is different. Everybody here who I’ve worked with is here for the right reasons. They want this. They’re willing to work for it, and that’s just unlike a lot of studios I was in. The percentage of people who are there for the right reasons, who are really here to train to be a real artist, to make brave and bold choices and to take it seriously. I think that’s a major difference. And you feel safe here to try that stuff.

How have Charlie and the other teachers at Maggie Flanigan Studio supported your individual growth?

I think it’s very individual. I feel like I have a specific relationship with each of my teachers. They teach each student slightly differently to what they need. I think it’s absolutely individualized, and I think that’s my favorite thing about it. My relationship with my teachers is much different than another student’s, and that’s how it should be.

What would you say to someone that is maybe a friend that has been working in the business for a while but hasn’t really committed to training or they feel like they’re stuck or maybe someone you’ve just met at a workshop and they’re maybe toying or thinking about committing to a two-year program specifically, maybe not your learning in studio?

I would say, going back to school is a very hard decision for me because I was worried that I was taking a step back. But at the same time, I felt like I didn’t have the fundamentals and at least in the beginning of the year no matter how frustrating the fundamentals are, and they definitely were, I think it’s built a much more solid foundation for myself to try scary things, and I think that’s the thing I would say to people who are thinking about doing that. If you don’t have a solid foundation, how do you build a career? So I’d say, “Absolutely. Jump in and do it.” This is the place for me.

Well, you’re finishing up your first year right now and you’re going to be heading into the second year in the fall, are you excited? How do you feel about that?

I’m very excited. We’ve gotten little tidbits that second years haven’t given everything away, but I’m really excited to try all of the things that we keep hearing whispers about and keep pushing and keep pushing. So, yes, I’m very excited for the second year.

So, Xandra, a few students who you began the first year with, in September, is no longer here, what does that say about the program, the passion, and the dedication it takes to become a serious actor?

I think this program focuses on artistry, first and foremost, and taking chances, but it also focuses on work ethic. There’s a lot demanded of you and most of it is on yourself. And, of course, the classes require you to build on it, but if you’re not working for yourself, then you’re not really doing anything. I think that this program so far has also trained me to push, and push, and push and always work hard. Charlie warned us at the beginning that that was the main thing we’re going to have to do, it’s just to work as hard as possible. And he was right. I don’t think I’ve ever worked as hard in a program before, and I’m really glad that I am.

And what would you say to a fellow actor who’s out there auditioning, maybe not booking, they’re working and want to be booking, that’s afraid that training will take away their authenticity, or put them in their head, or take away what makes them special. That coming to a program like this would get in the way that. What would you say to them?

I think that this program helps you explore your individuality. If anything, it Kind of illuminates it for yourself. I’ve discovered a lot more about myself and my own issues with acting or blocks that I’ve given myself all my tension and what that means for me as a person. I think that it helps you open up your individuality more than anything else. You have a better idea of who you are as a person, and what you believe, and what things really strike you. I think, if anything, it’s the opposite.

two year acting program - maggie flanigan studio 2017 01

The Two Year Acting Program at Maggie Flanigan Studio Begins January 3rd. Serious Actors Should Call to Arrange an Interview. Call (917) 789-1599.

Two Year Acting Program: Schedule an Interview

To learn more about the Meisner technique and the two-year acting program at the Maggie Flanigan studio, visit us online or call the studio during regular business hours at 917-789-1599.

The post Two Year Acting Program – Xandra Leigh Parker appeared first on Meisner Acting - The Maggie Flanigan Studio New York NY - 917-789-1599.

Two Year Acting Program - Best Meisner Based Two Year Acting Program - 917-789-1599


Watch video on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/MK4YKCrjKo0
via Maggie Flanigan Studio

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Alumni News: Jaina Lee Ortiz to Star in New Series on ABC

Coming off a two-season stint as the female lead in Fox’s crime drama series Rosewood, Jaina Lee Ortiz has been tapped for a starring role — believed to be a female lead — in ABC’s upcoming Grey’s Anatomy spinoff series. The 10-episode drama, which follows a group of heroic firefighters, hails from Grey’s Anatomy creator Shonda Rhimes’ Shondaland. [caption id="attachment_8967" align="aligncenter" width="800"]Acting Classes with Maggie Flanigan Acting Classes with Maggie Flanigan (917) 789-1599[/caption] Set in a Seattle firehouse, the spinoff, slated for a midseason launch, is being written by Grey’s executive producer/co-showrunner Stacy McKee. From the captain to the newest recruit, the show revolves around the brave men and women who risk their lives and their hearts both in the line of duty and off the clock. The lead characters are expected to be introduced in an episode of Grey‘s Anatomy this fall before the offshoot series launch midseason. McKee executive produces the spinoff with director Paris Barclay and Shondaland’s Rhimes and Betsy Beers for ABC Studios and studio-based Shondaland. Ortiz had been in demand since she became available in May when Fox canceled Rosewood after two seasons, fielding major series casting as well as talent holding deal offers. Ortiz has taken an unusual TV route that has involved no bit episodic parts. Her very first TV casting was a series regular in Chris Carter’s 2014 Amazon pilot The After, which was picked up to series. While the series ultimately did not get produced, Ortiz quickly landed the female lead opposite Morris Chestnut in the 2015 Fox drama pilot Rosewood, which also went to series. While wrapping the second season of Rosewood, she booked a major recurring role on the current second season of the USA drama series Shooter opposite Ryan Phillippe, which is now airing. Ortiz also starred in the independent features Misfire and Laid Out and can be seen on the web series The Shop. She is repped by WME and Link Entertainment. This news first appeared here: http://deadline.com/2017/07/greys-anatomy-spinoff-jaina-lee-ortiz-cast-the-lead-abc-1202136085/

The next blog post Alumni News: Jaina Lee Ortiz to Star in New Series on ABC is courtesy of Maggie Flanigan Read more on: http://maggieflaniganstudio.com

Alumni News: Jaina Lee Ortiz to Star in New Series on ABC

Acting Master Class with Maggie Flanigan (917) 789-1599

Coming off a two-season stint as the female lead in Fox’s crime drama series Rosewood, Jaina Lee Ortiz has been tapped for a starring role — believed to be a female lead — in ABC’s upcoming Grey’s Anatomy spinoff series. The 10-episode drama, which follows a group of heroic firefighters, hails from Grey’s Anatomy creator Shonda Rhimes’ Shondaland.

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Set in a Seattle firehouse, the spinoff, slated for a midseason launch, is being written by Grey’s executive producer/co-showrunner Stacy McKee. From the captain to the newest recruit, the show revolves around the brave men and women who risk their lives and their hearts both in the line of duty and off the clock.

The lead characters are expected to be introduced in an episode of Grey‘s Anatomy this fall before the offshoot series launch midseason.

McKee executive produces the spinoff with director Paris Barclay and Shondaland’s Rhimes and Betsy Beers for ABC Studios and studio-based Shondaland.

Ortiz had been in demand since she became available in May when Fox canceled Rosewood after two seasons, fielding major series casting as well as talent holding deal offers.

Ortiz has taken an unusual TV route that has involved no bit episodic parts. Her very first TV casting was a series regular in Chris Carter’s 2014 Amazon pilot The After, which was picked up to series. While the series ultimately did not get produced, Ortiz quickly landed the female lead opposite Morris Chestnut in the 2015 Fox drama pilot Rosewood, which also went to series. While wrapping the second season of Rosewood, she booked a major recurring role on the current second season of the USA drama series Shooter opposite Ryan Phillippe, which is now airing.

Ortiz also starred in the independent features Misfire and Laid Out and can be seen on the web series The Shop. She is repped by WME and Link Entertainment.

This news first appeared here: http://deadline.com/2017/07/greys-anatomy-spinoff-jaina-lee-ortiz-cast-the-lead-abc-1202136085/

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